The Barley and sorghum fields have been harvested and the {once} green, rolling hills of Northern Virginia are now brown and withered; meanwhile the bronze, red, and yellow hues from the hickory, beech, and red maple trees are scattered about the mountainside and valleys, creating a fiery picturesque scene.  Dotting the sides of the road are small farm stands selling freshly picked apples by the bushel, locally made ciders by the jug, and mason jars filled with jelly of all kinds, and honey.  The air is crisp with the pleasant scent of burning wood and chimney smoke here and there.   Oh, there are hundreds of things I could write about this beautiful time of the year, as well as the scenes and feelings felt within it.  It’s already passing by so quickly, soon all the trees will be bare and it will be brutally cold once again.

  But like all things in life, there is something I very much dislike about the fall season: the withering of all the lovely flowers.  Flowers are a very crucial part of my blogging as they are practically the only ‘props’ that I use.  Just when I was saddened by not having any flowers to decorate with, I went on a walking around my neighbor’s farm and then found a lone pink rose in one of the garden beds.  It was laden with rain droplets and was perfect in every way; alongside the rose were these pretty purple mums.  So, in the end, it worked out.  But, pretty soon I won’t be so lucky.

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  Now, as you can see if you scroll through my posts, these past few weeks I’ve been doing a lot of baking with apples.  I don’t think I’ll ever tire of baking with them, it’s quite a joy to come up with various baked goods that include the local fruits of my area.  Usually I would make my own apple by-products in my recipes as that’s something I like doing instead of buying it from a supermarket, but I was really anxious to bake this cake that I’ve had on my mind for quite some time(and was unable to bake as I was away from my kitchen); so, once I got home I visited one of the many farm stands in my area that was selling their locally made products.  I found the most delicious apple butter and it happened to be made by the local Lions Club members whom every year go out and pick apples from the orchards nearby and dedicate an entire day of their time in the kitchen of a community cannery making the apple butter.  They can a thousand or so jars of it and sell it around the county!  Even though I didn’t have time to make my own apple butter, I still got to use it fresh, and made with local apples, too.  

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  My absolute favorite part about this cake?  It would have to be the frosting.  I really wanted something delicious that wasn’t your mundane American buttercream, so I played with it a bit and added mascarpone cheese and custard that was flavored with that delicious apple butter I bought.  It’s like a hybrid American and German buttercream(and it’s oh so good).  It’s so smooth to the palate when eaten and it spreads so beautifully.  The cake itself is delicious, too; it is flavored with apple butter as well, along with ginger and all those other fall spices that I love to bake with this time of year. 

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*Majority of measurements used is in metric units.



175 grams unsalted butter, room temperature

500 grams granulated sugar

1 teaspoon vanilla

4 large fresh eggs, room temperature

1/3 cup local apple butter

250 grams cake flour

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/4 teaspoon baking soda

2 teaspoons ground ginger

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/2 teaspoon ground allspice

1/8 teaspoon ground nutmeg

312 grams milk, room temperature



2 large fresh egg yolks

3 tablespoons granulated sugar

1/3 cup + 3 tablespoons milk

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla

1/3 cup apple butter

8 ounces unsalted butter, room temperature

8 ounces mascarpone cheese, room temperature

2 cups powdered sugar, sifted

dash of ground cloves

pinch of salt


  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.  Grease and line(with parchment) three, 8-inch cake pans.
  2. In an electric standing mixer with whisks attached, combine the sugar, butter, and vanilla; beat on medium speed for 7-8 minutes until light and fluffy.  Meanwhile in a separate bowl, whisk together the flour, salt, spices, baking powder, and baking soda until combined.  Set aside.  Turn off the mixer and scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl, add the eggs; beating one at a time until just combined(about 10 seconds each egg).  Scrape down the sides of the bowl after each addition.  Add the apple butter and half of the flour mixture and half the milk.  Beat on medium until just combined; scrape down the bowl once more and add the remaining milk and flour, beat till just combined.  
  3. Pour into prepared pans and bake for 23-25 minutes.  Check for doneness at 23 minutes using a toothpick; if it comes out clean it’s done, if not, bake 2 more minutes or until the toothpick comes out clean.  Let the cakes rest in their pans for 10 minutes, then using a sharp knife, gently loosen the cakes from around the edges of the pan.  Invert onto wire racks to cool completely, about one hour.
  4.  Once cooled, assemble the cake.  Place the first layer flat side down on your cake board/plate/stand and add about 3/4 cups of the frosting.  Spread around with an offset spatula, then add the second layer, flat side facing up.  Add 3/4 more of the frosting, spread; then place the third layer, flat side facing up.  Add the remaining frosting to the top of the cake and around the sides(it’s a naked cake so there will be a very, very little frosting for the edges).


  1. Place a small mixing bowl in the refrigerator for later use.
  2. In a small saucepan, combine the milk and vanilla and bring to a simmer over medium-low heat, stirring often so it doesn’t burn.  Remove from heat and stir in the apple butter, let it sit for five minutes(it will look very grainy, so don’t freak out!).  Using a fine mesh strainer/sieve, strain out the mixture over a bowl to catch the liquid.  Discard the pulpy stuff and set the liquid aside.
  3. Create a double boiler by filling a medium-sized pot with a few inches of water, then place a heatproof bowl large enough to fit on top of the pot without touching the water.  Bring the water to a slow simmer over medium-low heat then add the egg yolks and sugar to the bowl; stir with a whisk until the sugar dissolves and egg yolks look a bit pale.  Continue to whisk the eggs, then slowly stream in the milk mixture.  Whisk constantly till the mixture is thick, this may take a few minutes.  Once the mixture has thickened, immediately remove the bowl from atop the pot of water and pour the custard into the chilled bowl.  Again, whisk frivolously until the mixture is cool to the touch.  
  4. In an electric mixer with beaters/whisks attached, add the soft butter and mascarpone cheese.  Beat on medium speed until combined and smooth.  Add the powdered sugar, salt, and custard and beat on medium-high until the mixture is combined and has become light in color and quite volumized, about 2 minutes.
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    Comfortably snuggled up in a warm, cozy sweater, quietly contemplating the morning view from a window seat someplace far away with a steaming cup of coffee warming my hands;  that is an ideal chilly, October Thursday.  One I laughingly wish I woke to.  Instead, I awoke to the worst bedhead, no clean clothes to wear to work, and an empty coffee bean container.  Even though the day began in such bad taste, I am grateful that the weather is beautiful and that there was a pot of homemade chili to eat for lunch on this semi-chilly Virginia day.

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  It’s been a busy past two weeks as my family awaits the birth of my eldest sister’s little boy any day now.  We’re hoping he stays put a wee bit longer until hurricane Matthew passes (they happen to live in North East Florida).  It’s quite nerve racking being six hundred miles away from almost all your family while there’s a dangerous hurricane on its way that will affect them and others where ever it goes.  I am staying hopeful that all will be safe during its chaos.

  On top of all that, I was having yet again one of (what I like to call) my rut weeks.  To refresh my mind, I made a quick trip to the apple orchard not nine miles down the road from me.  Upon arrival is a barn, and inside lie crates full of freshly picked red and green apples of all varieties.  In the back of the barn are more crates, but instead of apples, these are full with some of the prettiest looking decorative gourds, local pumpkin, and butternut squashes.  Lining the walls are glass jugs and mason jars filled with apple cider, honey, and maple syrup.  Each time I go to this particular orchard, it’s so hard to leave with only the apples I came for.  They also make some of the best fruit preserves!  It’s rather tempting.

  Arriving home I had my heart set on apple cider and chocolate, but what to create with two.  So, I decided on this apple cider caramel(which makes the sinfully rich brownie even more sinful), with a decadent chocolate brownie flavored with rum; there wasn’t but a couple tablespoons left in the bottle so, why not?

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7 tablespoons unsalted butter

4 ounces unsweetened chocolate, chopped

1 cup granulated sugar

2/3 cups cocoa powder

3/4 cups all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

3 tablespoons rum

2 large eggs, cold

-salted apple cider caramel-

1/4 cup apple cider

2 tablespoons heavy cream

2 tablespoon water

1-ounce unsalted butter

1 cup granulated sugar

sea salt 


  1. Preheat oven to 325°F.  Grease and line with parchment paper one, 8-inch cake pan.
  2. Fill a pot with a few inches of water and place over medium heat till it simmers.  Place a heatproof bowl that will sit over the top of the pot(don’t let it touch the water).  Add the butter, chopped chocolate, sugar, and cocoa powder.  Stir until just combined.  Let it sit over the simmering pot till the butter has melted and the mixture is somewhat hot when you dip your finger into it.  Remove the bowl from the pot and stir in the rum.  Let it cool until it’s just warm to touch.  Once cooled, add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.  The mixture should be glossy.  Whisk together the flour and salt in another bowl, then add to the chocolate mixture.  Stir well with a wooden spoon till all the flour is combined.  Pour into prepared pan and evenly spread around the pan.  Bake for 20-25 minutes, checking for doneness at the 20-minute mark with a toothpick(if it comes out clean it’s done, if not, bake for 5 minutes more).  Cool in pan for 20 minutes, then using a sharp knife, loosen around the edges.  Invert onto a wire rack then peel off the parchment.  Let it cool completely, then pour the caramel over the top.  Garnish with more sea salt(optional).


  1. In a medium sized saucepan, combine the apple cider, cream, butter, and sugar.  Stir slightly until just combined.  Bring the mixture to a boil over medium-high heat.  Stirring occasionally, boil till the mixture till it becomes a light amber color, then remove from heat.  Add a pinch of sea salt and stir.  It should thicken after sitting for a few minutes, but make sure you don’t let it sit too long in the pot or it will start to become firm.  After letting it sit for a couple 3-4 minutes, pour over the brownie and garnish with more sea salt(optional).
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  Lyric night of the lingering Indian Summer,
Shadowy fields that are scentless but full of singing,
Never a bird, but the passionless chant of insects,
Ceaseless, insistent.

  The grasshopper’s horn, and far-off, high in the maples,
The wheel of a locust leisurely grinding the silence
Under a moon waning and worn, broken,
Tired with summer.

  Let me remember you, voices of little insects,
Weeds in the moonlight, fields that are tangled with asters,
Let me remember, soon will the winter be on us,
Snow-hushed and heavy.

  Over my soul murmur your mute benediction,
While I gaze, O fields that rest after harvest,
As those who part look long in the eyes they lean to,
Lest they forget them.

  • Sara Teasdale, “September Midnight”

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  I was waiting until it was ‘officially’ fall to start baking with pumpkin; no matter how fall-ish it felt near the end of summer, I couldn’t get myself to use pumpkin just yet.  My supermarket just started selling local pumpkins this past week and that’s when I decided it was time to use them.  So, I welcomed the new season with a simple pumpkin cake, garnished with a nutty streusel that uses fresh, minced ginger root for flavor.  And of course, you can’t have a cake without some pourable, sugary topping, so I opted with delicious crème anglaise.  It went exceptionally well with the cake!

  When baking, I almost always make my own added ingredients when possible, instead of buying pre-made or canned ingredients.  So I used fresh pumpkin purée when I made this recipe.  You don’t have to use it fresh, though, canned pumpkin purée will work fine.  If you want the full flavor, I highly reccomend using fresh pumpkin purée.  It’s very simple to make.

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  On another note, this was my first actual styled shoot.  Most the time when I’m baking and it comes time to photograph the thing(s) which I just baked, I find myself rushing the entire process when I shouldn’t be; so I end up throwing things together onto a table with the subject and don’t pay close enough attention to the light I’m in.  I decided ahead of time that I wasn’t going to do that with this shoot.  So, I planned it all out instead of doing it on a whim like I usually find myself doing.  I was quite pleased with how the photos turned out and I didn’t spend nearly as many hours editing them, per usual.  

  I also went more with neatness.  I tend to be very messy when it comes to the props in my photographs, which are almost always flowers, dried or alive.  You see, I don’t have that big of a prop closet, but what I do have is an abundance of flowers and greenery as I’m a hoarder with those things and love drying them for later use or for decoration.  My prop closet is pretty much a small cardboard box filled with tinkerings I’ve found here and there while rummaging through antique stores(I rarely ever purchase brand new props, I like them old).  It’s a never ending learning process photography is, and the main key is patience.  Something I lack more often than not, but am learning to work on.  

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pumpkin cake

2 cups all-purpose flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/2 teaspoon baking soda

3/4 teaspoons kosher salt

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon ground cloves

1/8 teaspoon ground allspice

1/2 cup unsalted butter, room temp.

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

2 large eggs, room temp.

1 cup fresh or canned pumpkin purée

1/4 applesauce 

ginger streusel

2 ounces unsalted butter, cold and cubed

2 ounces granulated sugar

3 ounces all-purpose flour

3 ounces chopped pecans

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1 ginger root, minced

crème anglaise

1 cup whole milk

1/4 cup granulated sugar

3 large egg yolks

2 vanilla bean pods


  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.  Grease and line (with parchment paper) two loaf pans and set aside. 
  2. In a mixing bowl, combine the flour, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and spices; whisk till combined and set aside.
  3. In another (large) mixing bowl, combine the butter and sugar.  Using am electric hand mixer or standing mixer with whisks attached, beat the butter and sugar till fluffy.  Add the eggs, one at a time, beating well and scraping down the sides of the bowl after each addition.  Add the pumpkin purée, applesauce, and half of the flour.  Mix on medium speed till just combined, then add the remaining flour.  Again, mix till just combined. 
  4.  Divide the batter equally amongst the two loaf pans and spread around evenly in the pan(s).  Sprinkle with the streusel mixture.  Place in the preheated oven and bake for 40-45 minutes.  Check for doneness with a toothpick at 40 minutes; if it is clean it’s done, if not, bake for 3-5 more minutes.
  5.  Once the cake is done, let them sit in the pans for 10 minutes.  Use a sharp knife to loosen the cake from around the edges of the pan then gently invert onto wire racks to cool.  You can eat it cool or warmed.  Once it reaches the desired temperature, cut into slices, then drizzle on the crème anglaise with a spoon onto the individual slices. 


  1.  Wash, peel, and mince the ginger root and set aside.
  2. Whisk together the flour, sugar, and cinnamon.  Cut in the cold butter cubes using a pastry blender or pulse in a food processor.  The pieces should be large and crumbly.  Add the nuts and freshly grated ginger and stir with a spoon till combined.  Sprinkle on top the cake before baking.

crème anglaise:

  1. Fill a large pot with ice and water a few inches deep.  Place a thin mixing bowl in the center of it with strainer resting on top.  Set next to your stove for later use.
  2. In a medium sized saucepan, add the milk.  Split open the two vanilla bean pods and scrape out the seeds and put them into the milk along with the pods.  On medium-low heat, bring the milk to a simmer.  Meanwhile, combine the sugar and yolks, whisk till well blended.  Once the milk has come to a simmer, remove from heat also removing the vanilla bean pods.  
  3. While whisking the yolks, slowly stream in half of the hot milk into the yolks.  Once they’re combined, gently add the yolk mixture back into the remaining milk, continuing to whisk.  Return the mixture to medium heat and continue whisking until thickened.  Be sure the mixture does not boil, or the yolks will curdle.  It should be thick enough to coat the back of a spoon.  To test the thickness, run your finger along the back of the said spoon after dipping it in the creme, if the streak remains without the creme running back into it, it is done.  Turn off the heat and pour the creme into the strainer that is resting on top the mixing bowl in the ice water.  Once strained, continue to whisk the mixture till it’s cool to touch.  Cover and place in the refrigerator till ready to use.   Serve with the cake.
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  If I were to put fall in a food, it would have to be these doughnuts.  Cinnamon tossed pear encased in a slightly sweetened fried dough, then topped with a cream cheese glaze and then salted pistachios; they really are amazing.  They reminded me somewhat of apple fritters, except they’re made with pear and in doughnut form.

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  I thought it about time I made something using pears.  With the abundance of apples currently available here in Virginia, all I’ve been thinking about is baking something delicious with apples.  Pear is not as popularly grown here as apples are, and sadly, the majority of pear growers in my area are not having a good harvest this year due to the spring frosts.  So, I’m still waiting for them to come in so I can grab a few bushels of what they do have this season.  I had to use supermarket pears for these doughnuts, but if you can get local ones, I highly recommend using them, especially if you’re making these doughnuts.

  One of my favorite things to do is bake or cook with fresh, seasonal produce that is (preferably) grown locally.  And so, almost all of my recipes include at least one local ingredient that fits the season it’s grown in, that is if it’s possible.  It really adds so much more flavor, a flavor supermarket produce just can’t cut.  Not to mention they look so much prettier, too!  Supermarket produce, to me, always looks too perfect.

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for the dough

1 cup almond milk, heated to 110°F

5 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temp.

1/4 cup maple syrup

1 whole egg + 2 egg yolks, whisked slightly

3 to 3 1/2 cups bread flour

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

1/8 teaspoon nutmeg

1 tablespoon active dry yeast

vegetable oil, for frying

for the pear

2 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

2 tablespoons granulated sugar

1 Asian pear

for the glaze

8 ounces cream cheese, room temperature

2 cups powdered sugar

4 tablespoons almond milk

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

pinch of sea salt


1 cup coarsely chopped salted pistachios 

vegetable oil, for frying

oil / candy thermometer



  1. In a small saucepan placed over medium-low heat, heat the almond milk till it reaches 110°F, then remove from heat.  Take 1/4 cup of the hot milk and place it in a small bowl, sprinkle in the yeast, then a pinch of sugar, and let it sit for 10 minutes until it’s foamy.   If it does not foam, restart with new yeast.
  2. In an electric mixer with dough hook attached, add the remaining 3/4 cups warmed almond milk, butter, maple syrup, whisked eggs, salt, nutmeg, 2 cups of the flour; and lastly, the yeast mixture.  Mix on low till combined, then add the remaining amount of flour in batches till the dough pulls away from the sides of the bowl and cleans it.  The dough should be soft and slightly sticky when touched.  
  3. Remove dough from the mixing bowl and turn out onto a lightly floured surface and knead till it has a light coat of flour on it.  Shape dough into a ball and place in a lightly buttered bowl.  Cover with a thin towel and let rise in a warm, dry place for 30 minutes or till doubled in size.  Once the dough has risen, punch down and then tightly wrap the bowl in plastic wrap.  Place in the refrigerator for at least 12 hours, or make the dough the night before and let it sit over-night in the refrigerator.


  1.  Wash, peel, and core the pear and cut it into thin, small, square pieces.  Place in a strainer over a bowl and sprinkle with 1 tablespoon of sugar.  Cover with a towel and let it sit to drain juices for at least 25 minutes.  Meanwhile, prepare two large baking sheets by placing a non- terry towel on each one and lightly flour it, set them aside.  Once the pear has drained, pat the fruit dry, add the cinnamon and the remaining sugar.  Stir till each pieces is coated.  
  2. Remove the dough from the refrigerator and punch down.  Turn out onto a floured surface and roll into a large rectangle.  Sprinkle on the pears and fold over twice till you have a rectangular packet, pinch the edges shut.  Gently roll the dough out till it’s about 1/2 inch thick.  Using a doughnut cutter of your preferred size, cut out as many doughnuts as you can and place them on the prepared baking sheets, spacing each doughnut 2-inches apart.  Roll out the remaining dough scraps and doughnut hole centers and cut out more doughnuts.  Repeat till there’s no more dough left to roll out.  Cover the doughnuts and place in a warm, dry spot to rise for 30 minutes, or till doubled in size.
  3.  In a large pot, wok, or deep fryer, add the vegetable oil till it’s about 4 inches deep.  Heat the oil to 375°F and use an oil or candy thermometer to keep track of the temperature.   Once heated, add doughnuts, two at a time (if possible, 3).  Fry each side for 50-60 seconds till they’re a light golden color.  Remove from oil with a slotted spoon or wire mesh ladle and place on a cooling rack.  Repeat this process till all the doughnuts have been fried.  You can drizzle the glaze on while the doughnuts are hot, or you can wait till they’re just warm to touch.  If you want it to stay thick on the doughnut, dip the smooth top part of the doughnut in the glaze when they have completely cooled.  Sprinkle on the chopped pistachios.

  for the glaze:

With an electric hand mixer, beat the room temperature cream cheese till smooth, then add all other ingredients.  It should be thick, but not so thick that it won’t run off a spoon.

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  Almost two weeks have passed since I went traversing through an orchard in search of my favorite autumnal fruit.  It was the first of September, a very damp and dark one at that, but not at all in a depressing way.  It set the mood for the month, and since that day I have found myself wishing the last of summer away and yearning for fall to arrive with all its color and ecstasy.   

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  I rather loved the weather that day, I’m typing this now wishing I could go back as it is currently miserably hot and humid today.  It was quite cool that day and the fog was hanging low in the mountains; both the peaches and apples looked like candy dangling from a tree, but the apples looked especially pretty as they were bright red and glimmered with fresh droplets of rain.  I’m already excited about going back the end of this month or in early October when all the other varieties are ready.  

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  Walking under that canopy of peach trees reminded me somewhat of Alice in Wonderland as if in any given moment a white rabbit would emerge from somewhere, wearing a waistcoat and brandishing a pocket watch.  As silly as that sounds, that was the vibe I had while walking under these trees.  I really did have a smile on my face the entire time, I felt like a child who found a hideout somewhere amongst the brush.  I brought my baby sister with me (who is ten years old) and she had the same air to her.  She had so much fun picking the peaches all by herself.  I’m not sure how it would’ve felt if the sun was bright and shining.

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  Since I’ve probably talked enough about my orchard trip, I will now talk about these pies.  I’ve had this idea for mini pies, each donned with a different look, for quite some time but I didn’t have any mini pie tins.  Lucky for me I stumbled across a few just recently and was able to make them with the fruit I had just picked.  You don’t have to use mini pie tins as I did, though.  The dough amount is a perfect fit for an eight or nine-inch pie.  

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  I really love the combination of apples and peaches, though the sound of such a pie doesn’t flow as well as “apple and pear”, which was my first idea, then I switched fruits.  I see this combination as a last hoorah to summer, as peaches go out of season here around the first or second week of September and then the apples begin to arrive.  When the two are paired with rum it really is delicious!   



pie crust

12 ounces all-purpose flour

2 tablespoons turbinado sugar

1/8 teaspoon salt

6 ounces unsalted butter, cold and cut into cubes

3-4 ounces water, ice cold


3 peaches, cut into thin slices

3 apples, cut into thin slices

1 tablespoon lemon juice

3 tablespoons rum

1 cup sugar

2 tablespoons flour

1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

dash of ground nutmeg

oat topping

1/2 cup rolled oats

1/2 cup finely chopped walnuts (or pecans)

2 tablespoons pure maple syrup

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon


egg wash, (1 egg, 1 tablespoon water)

turbinado sugar, for sprinkling


for the pie:

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.  Have on hand three, 4-inch pie tins or one, 8 or 9-inch pie tin.  
  2. In a large mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, and salt, whisking till combined; add the cold butter and cut into the flour using a pastry blender or by pulsing in a food process till it clumps into pea-sized nuggets.  Push the flour to one side of the bowl and then add about two or three tablespoons of the cold water.  Gently toss the flour into the side with the water, using a fork, till it all comes together and forms a soft dough.  Add more water if needed.  Cut the dough equally in half and press each half into a flat disk, wrap in plastic wrap and refrigerate for 25-30 minutes or till ready to use.
  3. Cut the apples and peaches into thin slices and place in a bowl, toss in the lemon juice, then add the rum.  Let the fruit soak in the rum for about 25 minutes.
  4. In a small bowl, whisk together the sugar, flour, and spices.  Drain the rum from the fruit, add the sugar mixture to the fruit and toss gently with your hands or a spatula.
  5.  In another bowl, combine the oats, finely chopped nuts, one-half teaspoon cinnamon, and maple syrup.  Stir till it all comes together and is crumbly(but not dry).

 Assemble the pie:  

  1. Remove one of the dough halves from the refrigerator and place on a floured surface.  Gently roll into a wide enough circle that will overhang your pie plate by about 3 inches.  Press the dough into the pan and add the fruit, then place the pie in the refrigerator as you roll out the other half of the dough the same as you did the bottom crust.  Gently roll the dough onto the rolling pin and place over the top of the pie.  Crimp the edges together and brush the pie top with egg wash. Using a sharp knife, cut slits around the center of the pie.  Sprinkle on the oat topping and extra sugar and bake for 35-45 minutes.
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